Health benefits of potatoes!

Potatoes

Potatoes are quite popular in the US, and there are many ways to enjoy them. But people often keep wondering if they are healthy. Due to high starch content, potatoes get a bad name, but they are perfect for health.

One medium Russet Potato baked with the skin has 37 grams of carbohydrate with about 4 grams as fiber, no fat, 4.6 grams of protein, and 129 calories. It is also loaded with nutrients, including over 30% of the daily value for immune-supporting Vitamin C. It will fulfill the daily target of mineral and potassium that supports heart, nerve, muscles function, healthy blood pressure. Potatoes also provide Vitamin B and K, manganese, copper, zinc, and magnesium. Spuds are also rich in antioxidants, including anthocyanin compounds, flavonoids, carotenoids, and phenols found both in the flesh and skin of potatoes.

Potatoes of all variety are especially when consuming with the skin. One should include potatoes of all colors in the diet since each pigment is associated with a different protective compound. The carbohydrates and nutrients present in potatoes make an excellent source of fuel before or during exercise. If one is looking for a whole food option to power workout, consider nibbling potatoes about 30 minutes before the sweat session.

Potatoes also supply resistant starch. It cannot be digested or absorbed, and when it reaches the large intestine, it gets fermented, which triggers the body to burn fat. Cooked, cool potatoes naturally form more resistant starch, so before eating the potatoes, cool them to room temperature. With leftover potatoes in the fridge, one can make salads. Research shows that potatoes tend to be more satiating than other starchy carbs.

In 2020, research published in the journal Clinical Nutrition looked at the impact of potatoes vs rice as part of a mixed dinner on overnight blood sugar regulation and post-meal in people with type 2 diabetes. The potatoes were boiled and cooled or boiled, roasted. Each meal contained 20% protein, 30% fat, 50% carbohydrate. Blood samples were collected from the volunteers before, immediately after, and then every 30 minutes for a couple of hours. The volunteers also wore a continuous glucose monitor so that glucose levels could be monitored during sleep. The study didn’t find any significant differences between rice and potatoes or between the potato preparation. Researchers said potatoes are suitable for people with diabetes when consuming as a part of a balanced meal and don’t disturb blood glucose regulation.

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