Australia, Sri Lanka to build policy frameworks in KLIE program

The Knowledge and Linkages for an Inclusive Economy (KLIE) Grant Program will help in collaborating organizations of Australia and Sri Lanka and will help in policy development of both the countries, based on governance, food security, social protection, health security, economic recovery, disaster management and bio-security.

The Knowledge and Linkages for an Inclusive Economy (KLIE) Grant Program will help in collaborating organizations of Australia and Sri Lanka and will help in policy development of both the countries, based on governance, food security, social protection, health security, economic recovery, disaster management and bio-security.

“KLIE brings together Australia and Sri Lanka organisations to collaborate and find solutions to shared challenges”, said authorities on the official account of Australian High Commission in Colombo, accredited to Sri Lanka and Maldives.

The Knowledge and Linkages for an Inclusive Economy (KLIE) Grant Program aims to promote collaborations between Australian and Sri Lankan research institutions, government organizations, civil society organizations, and professional networks. The goal of these partnerships is to advance policy discourse, gather data, and test minor reforms.
It will improve knowledge exchange through projects. KLIE funding has been committed for about $4.1 million since 2018.

KLIE collaborations are twinning agreements in which Australian capacities and experience are used to promote creative initiatives in a variety of Sri Lankan development cooperation fields. As we continue to work together and cooperate in the goal of secure, successful societies as well as inclusive economic recovery and progress, these partnerships help to build a long-lasting and strong relationship between Australia and Sri Lanka.

In order to create a new cadre of experts within Sri Lankan public, private, and nongovernmental organizations, this project is collaborating with Australian and Sri Lankan organizations engaged in women’s economic empowerment initiatives. Through research, policy recommendations, and capacity building initiatives, the project will support women’s economic empowerment and labor force participation in Sri Lanka.

Working with Sri Lankan partners, the University of Sydney is exploring the potential for a fresh, sustainable marine aquaculture sector there. An emerging marine aquaculture sector with significant export potential will boost domestic food security and standard of living.
The Generic ePhyhto National System (GeNS) is being operationalized in Sri Lanka with assistance from Australia. The International Plant Protection Convention has implemented the GeNS, a web-based system, and the ePhyto, an electronic phytosanitary certificate. The system is in place to stop the introduction and spread of pests through activities such as import and export that could endanger resources for terrestrial and aquatic plant life and aid Sri Lanka in regaining its economic footing.

Latest articles

EXPLAINED: The Labour party’s foreign policy in UK

David Lammy, Member of Parliament and Shadow Secretary of UK's State for Foreign, Commonwealth, and Development Affairs, provides an overview of Labour's proposal for...

Australian defence gets strong with new helicopters

To better equip the Australian Army, the Australian government has decided to purchase 40 UH-60M Black Hawk helicopters. According to the Head of Land Capability,...

OPINION: Australia’s road in preserving Indigenous languages

“With a multi-million dollar investment in language education, Australia has embraced the global movement to preserve Indigenous languages, which was launched last month in...

Mental health: Australia’s BMX program is running success among youth

Teenagers in South Australia are using BMX bikes as a form of stress reduction. Young people who had a difficult begining in life might be...

Related articles